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Satellite launch from California is delayed
Sat, 17 Feb 2018 23:57:15 -0500

Satellite launch from California is delayedA SpaceX satellite launch from California that could create a spectacular aerial display has been delayed


6-Year-Old Boy Among Four People Shot Outside a Steakhouse in Texas
Mon, 19 Feb 2018 04:25:30 -0500

6-Year-Old Boy Among Four People Shot Outside a Steakhouse in TexasThe shooter is still at large


Astronomers Find Nearly 100 New Exoplanets
Sun, 18 Feb 2018 14:01:00 -0500

Astronomers Find Nearly 100 New ExoplanetsAstronomers spent four years pouring over data from NASA's Kepler space telescope's K2 mission and found 95 new planets.


Medical examiner taps DNA science to find missing persons
Sun, 18 Feb 2018 11:11:00 -0500

Medical examiner taps DNA science to find missing personsMedical examiner collects DNA samples to help families find remains of missing loved ones across the country


Indonesia's Sinabung volcano unleashes towering ash column
Mon, 19 Feb 2018 03:25:24 -0500

Indonesia's Sinabung volcano unleashes towering ash columnJAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — Rumbling Mount Sinabung on the Indonesian island of Sumatra shot billowing columns of ash more than 5,000 meters (16,400 feet) into the atmosphere and hot clouds down its slopes on Monday.


Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu Warns Iran to 'Not Test Israel’s Resolve'
Sun, 18 Feb 2018 20:52:28 -0500

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu Warns Iran to 'Not Test Israel’s Resolve'Netanyahu said the nuclear deal with Iran has emboldened Tehran


Experts: Vast underwater archeology site imperiled in Mexico
Mon, 19 Feb 2018 15:24:46 -0500

Experts: Vast underwater archeology site imperiled in MexicoMexican experts say the recently mapped Sac Actun cave system "is probably the most important underwater archaeological site in the world," but is threatened by pollution


Robots are working together to open doors
Sat, 17 Feb 2018 23:05:09 -0500

Robots are working together to open doorsBoston Dynamics released footage of robots join forces; 'The Greg Gutfeld' panel reacts.


'One of the Good Guys.' Mourners Honor Slain Chicago Police Commander
Sat, 17 Feb 2018 19:02:54 -0500

'One of the Good Guys.' Mourners Honor Slain Chicago Police CommanderOf all Commander Paul Bauer's responsibilities, the ones that mattered the most to him were being a good husband and father, speakers said


France to let wolf packs grow despite angry farmers
Mon, 19 Feb 2018 11:59:15 -0500

France to let wolf packs grow despite angry farmersThe French government announced Monday it will allow the wolf population to grow 40 percent despite pressure from farmers in mountain regions who are worried about their sheep flocks. A new strategy unveiled by the centrist government of President Emmanuel Macron will enable the number of wolves to increase from an estimated 360 now to 500 by 2023. Hunting wiped out the grey wolf in France during the 1930s and they only returned in 1992 via Italy -- currently home to around 2,000 wolves -- before spreading into Switzerland and Germany.


The First Brit: Secrets of the 10,000 Year Old Man, review – a smartly told, fact-filled and inventive documentary
Sun, 18 Feb 2018 16:00:00 -0500

The First Brit: Secrets of the 10,000 Year Old Man, review – a smartly told, fact-filled and inventive documentaryThe First Brit: Secrets of the 10,000 Year Old Man (Channel 4) started with a Union Jack flag billowing against a cloudy sky and Speaker Bercow’s idiosyncratic "Order! Order!". “There’s been a lot of talk lately about Britain,” boomed narrator Jim Carter (Downton Abbey’s Mr Carson). “About who belongs and who doesn’t.” “Now science is about to reveal the truth about where we come from,” he continued. “And. Who. We. Really. Are.” It was a sensationalist beginning. The edit flashed forward to what would be the climactic scene: the exposing of Cheddar Man’s face. Dun, dun, dun! Up went the curtain to reveal the first Brit who, as you’ll know if you’ve read the news recently, was not the light-skinned Viking once assumed. Thankfully, the hyperbole ended there. The story was told by the impressive group of ancient DNA experts at the Natural History Museum, genetics professors at UCL and archaeologists who worked together to analyse the entire DNA of Britain’s oldest skeleton for the first time. Beforehand, the facts about Cheddar Man were sparse. His skeleton was unearthed in Gough’s Cave, Cheddar Gorge, Somerset in 1903. He was 5 ft 5, 10 stone, and died in his early twenties about 10,000 years ago. Using the latest sequencing technology, the scientists conducting the full DNA analysis promised to tell us what he looked like, where his ancestors were from, and how he related to us today. The documentary artfully brought the story of Cheddar Man to life. Animated maps of Mesolithic Europe showed bands of hunter gatherers hopping across Doggerland to set up home in Britain. A flint turned into a knife to slice through raw flesh and harpoons were whittled from antlers. Adrie (left) and Alfons Kennis sit beside their full facial reconstruction model of a head based on the skull of Britain's oldest complete skeleton We learned that Stone Age people kept dogs and made shelters out of wood and animals skins, which could be quickly moved if needed. You may have known all this already, but there was a twist in the tale. Around 5,000 years before Cheddar Man, temporary visitors appeared in Britain during an ice age thaw. It appeared, from cut and chew marks on bones, that they were cannibals. Dr Silvia Bello examined the finger and toe bones of a toddler and two teenagers, which were probably crushed “between the teeth to suck the grease.” It was enough to put anyone off their supper, especially if chicken wings were on the menu. Intriguingly, the cannibalism wasn’t driven by hunger. Instead, the team thought that the act of drinking out of your dead nan’s skull, for example, was a sign of respect. So was Cheddar Man descended from cannibals? In which – case dun, dun, dun – were we? Oo-er. Britain's oldest complete skeleton  But back to the main question. What did he look like? Charismatic Dutch identical twins and prehistoric model-makers Alfons and Adrie Kennis were tasked with the reconstruction. Details started to flood in as DNA was crunched in London. Eyes? Blue. Hair? Dark and curly. The real surprise was skin colour. It turned out he had much darker skin than expected, suggesting that paler skin in Britain and Europe may be a far more recent phenomena than previously thought. We learnt that Cheddar’s ancestors came from the Middle East, which had been suspected but never proven – and that we share his genetic legacy. Even if you’d seen photos already, the reveal was quite something. The model of Cheddar Man looked like a real man, with intelligence, humour and sensibility. And, no, there wasn’t a direct link with the cannibals. But, as one of the scientists said, it may be we have to rethink some of our notions of what it means to be British.


2 bears burned in California wildfire spotted in the wild
Sun, 18 Feb 2018 15:19:59 -0500

2 bears burned in California wildfire spotted in the wildGOLETA, Calif. (AP) — Officials tracking two bears that were badly burned in the largest wildfire in California history say the animals are settling back into their home in the wild after receiving unusual treatment for their injured paws.


Turmoil shakes up agency in charge of vast US lands
Mon, 19 Feb 2018 12:38:45 -0500

Turmoil shakes up agency in charge of vast US landsA year of upheaval at the U.S. Interior Department has seen dozens of senior staff members reassigned and key leadership positions left unfilled, rules considered burdensome to industry shelved, and a ...


The 2018 Flu Season Might Finally Be Leveling Off
Sat, 17 Feb 2018 19:58:50 -0500

The 2018 Flu Season Might Finally Be Leveling OffThis nasty flu season, which has been worsening for months, may finally be leveling off.


Researchers discover hidden details lurking beneath a Picasso masterpiece
Sun, 18 Feb 2018 15:56:46 -0500

Researchers discover hidden details lurking beneath a Picasso masterpieceThere are many layers to great art — sometimes literally.  We are reminded of this fact by researchers at the Art Institute of Chicago's Center for Scientific Studies in the Arts, who have revealed hidden details lurking beneath the Pablo Picasso masterpiece "La miséreuse accroupie."   SEE ALSO: This app tells you which museum art you look like and it's way too real While the presence of another artwork — specifically, a painting of the Catalan countryside by a different artist — below Picasso's "Crouching Beggar" has been known about since the 1990s, Science reports that we now are able to see previously hidden elements of Picasso's work.  Using a technique known as macro x-ray fluorescence imaging, scientists determined that Picasso painted a woman's hand holding a piece of bread before later covering it up with a cloak.  Picasso's "Crouching Woman."Image: US Public DomainIn other words, the canvas on which "Crouching Beggar" rests doesn't just contain the two paintings, but it also has various iterations of Picasso's work. This shows that, for whatever reason, the artist had a change of heart and did away with a specific element of his own painting. “Picasso had no qualms about changing things during the painting process,” explained Marc Walton, a research professor at Northwestern’s McCormick School of Engineering, in a press release.  “Our international team — consisting of scientists, a curator and a conservator — has begun to tease apart the complexity of ‘La Miséreuse accroupie,’ uncovering subtle changes made by Picasso as he worked toward his final vision.” Pretty cool.  That discovery helps art historians better understand the working style of one of the world's most respected artists.  “We now are able to develop a chronology within the painting structure to tell a story about the artist’s developing style and possible influences,” Sandra Webster-Cook, the Art Gallery of Ontario's senior conservator of paintings, observed in the same press release.  That the story is being told roughly 45 years after the artist's death reminds us that nothing is static about great art, even when it comes to something as seemingly frozen in time as a painting.  WATCH: Meet the artist who programmed a robot to create his artwork for him


Bizarre Camouflage Skills of the Cuttlefish Have Finally Been Explained by Science
Mon, 19 Feb 2018 10:55:33 -0500

Bizarre Camouflage Skills of the Cuttlefish Have Finally Been Explained by ScienceHere a cuttlefish can be seen camouflaging itself against the algae-covered rocks that surround it. “The biggest surprise for us was to see that these skin spikes, called papillae, can hold their shape in the extended position for more than an hour, without neural signals controlling them,” Paloma Gonzalez-Bellido, from the University of Cambridge, an author of the study, said in a statement.


Rhode Island State Senator Charged With Extorting Sex from Page
Mon, 19 Feb 2018 13:03:41 -0500

Rhode Island State Senator Charged With Extorting Sex from PageThe indictment says GOP Sen. Nick Kettle coerced a male page into sex on two occasions in 2011


Palmreaders? Japan team builds second skin message display
Sat, 17 Feb 2018 21:18:48 -0500

Palmreaders? Japan team builds second skin message displayPalmreading could take on a whole new meaning thanks to a new invention from Japan: an ultra-thin display and monitor that can be stuck directly to the body. Takao Someya, the University of Tokyo professor who developed the device, envisions it as a boon for medical professionals with bed-ridden or far-flung patients, as well as family living far from their relatives.


WATCH: World’s First Footage of Baby Dumbo Octopus
Mon, 19 Feb 2018 12:00:02 -0500

WATCH: World’s First Footage of Baby Dumbo OctopusFor the first time, scientists have witnessed the birth of one of the ocean’s strangest creatures: a dumbo octopus. While on a research cruise east of Cape Cod in 2005, marine biologist Tim Shank was remotely operating an underwater vehicle to collect coral. Shank filmed the opening and saw that it had contained a tiny dumbo octopus.


Singapore to impose carbon tax from 2019
Mon, 19 Feb 2018 04:56:33 -0500

Singapore to impose carbon tax from 2019Singapore said Monday it would impose a carbon tax from next year to cut its greenhouse gas emissions and make companies more competitive as global agreements on climate change take effect. Finance Minister Heng Swee Keat said the tax would be levied on all facilities producing 25,000 tonnes or more of greenhouse gas emissions a year. The tax, to be applied to all sectors, will be Sg$5.0 ($3.8) per tonne of greenhouse gas emissions from 2019 to 2023, after which the levy will be reviewed and possibly raised to between Sg$10 and Sg$15 per tonne by 2030.


You’re Not Having A Midlife Crisis, But Here’s the Science Anyway
Mon, 19 Feb 2018 08:55:43 -0500

You’re Not Having A Midlife Crisis, But Here’s the Science AnywayThe midlife crisis guy is an easily recognizable cultural archetype. Maybe he’s got a big stupid Corvette and a small dumb hat to match his crippling self-doubt. Maybe he’s hitting on a waitress. Maybe he’s letting a marriage dissolve. He’s a pathetic sort of villain facing down a long-deferred personal reckoning with failure and feelings. But... View Article The post You’re Not Having A Midlife Crisis, But Here’s the Science Anyway appeared first on Fatherly.


Gus Kenworthy and His Boyfriend Kissed on TV at the Olympics and Fans Are Ecstatic
Sat, 17 Feb 2018 22:39:06 -0500

Gus Kenworthy and His Boyfriend Kissed on TV at the Olympics and Fans Are EcstaticHe is one of the first openly gay Americans to compete at the Winter Olympics


In Kenya, anti-poaching dogs are wildlife's best friends
Mon, 19 Feb 2018 05:45:22 -0500

In Kenya, anti-poaching dogs are wildlife's best friendsFive-month-old bloodhound Shakaria gambols through the long savannah grasses of Kenya's Maasai Mara reserve, her playful mood swiftly turning to keen determination as she is ordered to track a human scent. Shakaria is top of her class of five puppies being trained by American experts to join a tracker dog unit, which has become pivotal in the fight against poaching in the Mara Triangle, part of the vast Maasai Mara ecosystem in southern Kenya that merges into Tanzania's Serengeti. It is here that over one million wildebeest, and tens of thousands of other animals cross from Tanzania into Kenya on their annual migration, attracting hordes of tourists, but also poachers seeking an easy target.


Why Do We Behave the Way We Do? New Research Reveals Biology Guiding Different Life Stages
Sun, 18 Feb 2018 16:06:15 -0500

Why Do We Behave the Way We Do? New Research Reveals Biology Guiding Different Life StagesThe simple worm sometimes behaves differently from others with the exact same genes—an evolutionary advantage that confounds basic genetics, according to a new study. Researchers studying why the tiny creatures behave a certain way at different life stages found that worms with identical genes and living in the same environment will nonetheless engage in atypical behavior. Using a newly developed system, scientists were able to record the worms’ behavior for their entire life cycle, which lasts about 50 hours.


Scientists have figured out how to make wood even stronger than steel
Mon, 19 Feb 2018 13:40:57 -0500

Scientists have figured out how to make wood even stronger than steelResearchers at the University of Maryland have found a way to make wood more than 10 times stronger than titanium alloys. The results could make it an alternative to steel, but much lighter.


Study cited for blaming autism on TV cartoon does not exist
Mon, 19 Feb 2018 13:05:02 -0500

Study cited for blaming autism on TV cartoon does not existWASHINGTON (AP) — There is no Harvard study that says a British children's television cartoon causes autism, despite what a social media post claims. In fact, there's at least one peer-reviewed study that hints that a children's television show may help autistic kids.


Our treatment of animals is stalling human progress
Mon, 19 Feb 2018 06:00:26 -0500

Our treatment of animals is stalling human progressIn Steven Pinker’s new book out this month, Enlightenment Now, the Harvard professor catalogs reams of data to show that the world has actually gotten much better over time, despite what you hear on the news. The book looks at increased life spans, decreased inequality, and even a 37-fold reduction in deaths from lightning bolts…


OAR, BLR, AUT, SUI: Here's What All the Olympics Country Abbreviations Mean
Sun, 18 Feb 2018 00:01:25 -0500

OAR, BLR, AUT, SUI: Here's What All the Olympics Country Abbreviations MeanFrom OAR to BLR


Google Lunar XPrize Is a Bust -- But This Company Could Still Go to the Moon
Mon, 19 Feb 2018 06:03:00 -0500

Google Lunar XPrize Is a Bust -- But This Company Could Still Go to the MoonCould Jeff Bezos and Blue Origin succeed where so many others have just failed?


Asteroid miners might need a few good applied astronomers to show them the way
Sat, 17 Feb 2018 21:39:38 -0500

Asteroid miners might need a few good applied astronomers to show them the wayAUSTIN, Texas — Mining asteroids for water and other resources could someday become a trillion-dollar business, but not without astronomers to point the way. At least that’s the view of Martin Elvis, a researcher at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, who’s been taking a close look at the science behind asteroid mining. If the industry ever takes off the way ventures such as Redmond, Wash.-based Planetary Resources and California-based Deep Space Industries hope, “that opens up new employment opportunities for astronomers,” Elvis said today in Austin at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. In space,… Read More



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