Latest News From WHMA
Texan running 3-D printed guns company sent back to U.S. by Taiwan authorities
Sat, 22 Sep 2018 10:43:15 -0400

Texan running 3-D printed guns company sent back to U.S. by Taiwan authoritiesTAIPEI/AUSTIN, Texas (Reuters) - A Texan running a 3-D printed guns company who flew to Taiwan as police investigated an accusation he had sex with an underage girl was deported back to the United States on Saturday after his U.S. passport was annulled, a Taiwanese official said. Cody Wilson, 30, was on Friday taken to immigration authorities in Taipei by officers from Taiwan's Criminal Investigation Bureau, according to officials. Zhang said Wilson, who was held by the agency, had been taken to Taipei's Taoyuan International Airport for a flight to the United States on Saturday evening.


U.S. airlines score win as Congress drops 'reasonable fee' rules
Sat, 22 Sep 2018 10:35:04 -0400

U.S. airlines score win as Congress drops 'reasonable fee' rulesThe U.S. airline industry scored a win on Saturday as bipartisan congressional legislation dropped plans to mandate "reasonable and proportional" baggage and change fees, but included other new passenger protections. After weeks of negotiations, a 1,200-page bill to reauthorize the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) was unveiled early Saturday that would require the FAA to set minimum dimensions for passenger seats -- including legroom and width -- and prohibits airlines from involuntarily removing passengers from flights after they’ve cleared the boarding gate. In April 2017, video went viral on social media of 69-year-old passenger David Dao being dragged from a United Airlines flight at Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport after he refused to give up his seat to make room for crew members.


Ordering opioids online? Mail carrier may also deliver handcuffs
Sat, 22 Sep 2018 06:21:07 -0400

Ordering opioids online? Mail carrier may also deliver handcuffsHe looked like a regular mail carrier, dropping off an unremarkable package at an upscale New York City apartment tower, but neither the man nor the package were quite what they seemed. The mail carrier was really a federal agent, conducting a so-called controlled delivery, a tactic the U.S. government employs to help stem the flow of heroin, prescription painkillers and other opioids fueling the nation's epidemic of fatal overdoses. Drug-filled packages with misleading labels have become a common sight at John F. Kennedy International Airport's (JFK) sprawling mail-sorting hangars, a front line in the battle against opioids.



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